LECTURE PROGRAMME VENUE: The Theatre of the Guildhall Arts Centre, St Peter’s Hill, Grantham 09.50 – 10.25 Coffee/Tea (complimentary to members) 10.50 Please be seated for Chairman’s welcome and notices 11.00 Lecture begins promptly 12.00 noon Approximate end of lecture GUESTS Please notify the Membership Secretary at least 7 days before the Lecture. A Guest will have free entry on their first visit, after which they can attend one additional lecture which will be charged at a fee of £5. Please ensure your mobile phone is switched off. 2023/24 Membership year 20th February 2024 Valerie Shrimplin Art & Astronomy - Sir Christopher Wren: Architect- Astronomer Having designed St Paul’s Cathedral and more than 50 other London Churches after the Great Fire of London (1666), Sir Christopher Wren is better known as an architect rather than astronomer. But, as a Professor of Astronomy for the first part of his career, much of his architectural work still echoes his earlier astronomical and scientific ideas. Drawing on Wren’s role as a Professor of Astronomy (and details that survive of some of his lectures) this talk will aim to bridge the gap between the two major aspects of Wren’s career by focussing on the astronomical elements that influenced his later architectural career, especially the astronomical symbolism and significance of St Paul’s Cathedral and other selected Wren churches in the City of London. Christopher Wren by Godfrey Kneller 1711 Public Domain 19th March 2024 Steve King The Story behind the Song Save The Last Dance For Me was recorded by the Drifters in 1960, with Ben E King on lead vocals, but what single event in the life of one of its writers inspired the track? Was Every Breath You Take by The Police really written as a love song? What is the truth about the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, and why did George Harrison stop composing for three years in 1976? We all have personal memories we associate with individual songs, but each song has its own story. In this lecture, the real stories behind some the world’s best known songs are revealed. 16th April 2024 Nirvana Romell FRESCOES OF FLORENCE – From Giotto To Masaccio Florence boasts a wealth of frescoes, from Giotto to Masaccio thanks to the 'original oligarchs' (wealthy Florentine patrons and their numerous private chapels). By Masaccio - book: John T. Spike, Masaccio, Rizzoli libri illustrati, Milano 2002, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7279949 21st May 2024 Sophie Matthews MUSIC IN ART So many of our historical references for musical instruments can be found in works of art. Not only can these windows into the past show us what the instruments looked like but also the social context in which they would have been played. Music and different instruments also play a strong role within symbolism in art. Sophie explores the instruments in selected works and then gives live demonstrations on replicas of the instruments depicted. Musicerende_engelen,_Hans_Memling,_(1483- 1494) 18th June 2024 Andy McConnell Bottoms Up! A History of Wine, its Rituals and its Vessels This light-hearted talk examines the history of wine, an elixir that has sustained much of humanity for almost 10,000 years. Essentially little more than fermented grape juice, this extraordinary and contradictory liquid has caused wars and riots, has helped broker peace and more commonly, served as an aphrodisiac. It has been personified in the form of Gods and been the principal catalyst in civilised entertaining and dining rituals. Bottom’s Up! traces the story of wine: from its humble beginnings in rotting grapes before the Bronze Age to the present . It examines the extraordinary diversity of paintings and artefacts, including drinking vessels, created by some of history’s greatest artists and craftsmen to enhance the pleasure of wine, and to impress guests. The talk visits the ancient societies of Egypt, Greece and Rome, travels through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and 18th century Britain. It culminates in the present day, when more wine is being consumed than ever before, with its world market now worth over £100 billion. The acknowledgement for the attached illustration is Wikipedia Commons/b/b9/carafe_iran.jpeg The new membership year begins in September 2024 Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
The Arts Society Grantham
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
LECTURE PROGRAMME   VENUE:  The Theatre of the Guildhall Arts Centre, St Peter’s Hill, Grantham   09.50 – 10.25  Coffee/Tea (complimentary to members) 10.50               Please be seated for Chairman’s welcome and notices 11.00               Lecture begins promptly 12.00 noon     Approximate end of lecture  GUESTS Please notify the Membership Secretary at least 7 days before the Lecture. A Guest will have free entry on their first visit, after which they can attend one additional lecture which will be charged at a fee of £5.   Please ensure your mobile phone is switched off  Membership year 2023/2024  20th February 2024		 Valerie Shrimplin	 Art & Astronomy -  Sir Christopher Wren: Architect-Astronomer  Having designed St Paul’s Cathedral and more than 50 other London Churches after the Great Fire of London (1666), Sir Christopher Wren is better known as an architect rather than astronomer. But, as a Professor of Astronomy for the first part of his career, much of his architectural work still echoes his earlier astronomical and scientific ideas.   Drawing on Wren’s role as a Professor of Astronomy (and details that survive of some of his lectures) this talk will aim to bridge the gap between the two major aspects of Wren’s career by focussing on the astronomical elements that influenced his later architectural career, especially the astronomical symbolism and significance of St Paul’s Cathedral and other selected Wren churches in the City of London.  Christopher Wren by Godfrey Kneller 1711 Public Domain   19th March 2024		 Steve King		 The Story behind the Song  Save The Last Dance For Me was recorded by the Drifters in 1960, with Ben E King on lead vocals, but what single event in the life of one of its writers inspired the track? Was Every Breath You Take by The Police really written as a love song? What is the truth about the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, and why did George Harrison stop composing for three years in 1976?   We all have personal memories we associate with individual songs, but each song has its own story. In this lecture, the real stories behind some the world’s best known songs are revealed.   16th April 2024			 Nirvana	Romell		 FRESCOES OF FLORENCE – From Giotto To Masaccio  Florence boasts a wealth of frescoes, from Giotto to Masaccio  thanks to the 'original oligarchs' (wealthy Florentine patrons and their numerous private chapels) 	  21st May 2024			 Sophie Matthews	 MUSIC IN ART     So many of our historical references for musical instruments can be found in works of art. Not only can these windows into the past show us what the instruments looked like but also the social context in which they would have been played.   Music and different instruments also play a strong role within symbolism in art. Sophie explores the instruments in selected works and then gives live demonstrations on replicas of the instruments depicted. Musicerende_engelen,_Hans_Memling,_(1483- 1494)  18th June 2024			 Andy McConnell	 Bottoms Up! A History of Wine, its Rituals and its Vessels  This light-hearted talk examines the history of wine, an elixir that has sustained much of humanity for almost 10,000 years. Essentially little more than fermented grape juice, this extraordinary and contradictory liquid has caused wars and riots, has helped broker peace and more commonly, served as an aphrodisiac. It has been personified in the form of Gods and been the principal catalyst in civilised entertaining and dining rituals.   Bottom’s Up! traces the story of wine: from its humble beginnings in rotting grapes before the Bronze Age to the present . It examines the extraordinary diversity of paintings and artefacts, including drinking vessels, created by some of history’s greatest artists and craftsmen to enhance the pleasure of wine, and to impress guests.   The talk visits the ancient societies of Egypt, Greece and Rome, travels through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and 18th century Britain. It culminates in the present day, when more wine is being consumed than ever before, with its world market now worth over £100 billion.  The acknowledgement for the attached illustration is Wikipedia Commons/b/b9/carafe_iran.jpeg  The New membership year beings at the September meeting
Programme of Lectures