LECTURE PROGRAMME VENUE: The Theatre of the Guildhall Arts Centre, St Peter’s Hill, Grantham 09.50 – 10.25 Coffee/Tea (complimentary to members) 10.50 Please be seated for Chairman’s welcome and notices 11.00 Lecture begins promptly 12.00 noon Approximate end of lecture GUESTS Please notify the Membership Secretary at least 7 days before the Lecture. A Guest will have free entry on their first visit, after which they can attend one additional lecture which will be charged at a fee of £5. Please ensure your mobile phone is switched off. 2022/3 Provisional programme for 2022/23 Membership year 20th September 2022 Simon Seligman From Venice to Sheffield: Ruskin's Passion for Arts, Craft & Social Justice Inspired by the bicentenary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819 – 1900) in 2019, this lecture celebrates the extraordinary life and work of this visionary Victorian. As writer, teacher, artist, collector, patron and critic, Ruskin was perhaps the most complete polymath of the 19th century. He left behind a dazzling range of writing and collections that continue to inspire and generate debate around the world. Perhaps most famous today as a champion of Turner and admirer of Venice, Ruskin’s impact ranged far and wide; his ideas inspired the Arts and Crafts Movement and the founding of the National Trust, the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, and the Labour Movement. George Eliot wrote ‘I venerate him as one of the great teachers of the day’, and he influenced the thinking of Tolstoy, Proust and Gandhi among others. Alongside this international reach, Ruskin became deeply concerned by what he saw as the negative impacts of the industrialization of 19th century England, and as a teacher, thinker and philanthropist he set up projects that aspired to give the working man access to beauty, art, craft and the land. In 1871, he founded what became the Guild of St George, the charity for arts, crafts and the rural economy, and gave it a sizeable collection of art, books and minerals for public display and education in Sheffield. Today, cared for by Museums Sheffield, the collection continues to honour his legacy, sharing something of Ruskin’s encyclopaedic European sensibility for the benefit of a 21st century city. This lecture spans Ruskin’s life and work from the timeless and global to the intimate and exquisite, to paint a portrait of a great life. Above: John Ruskin in his thirties Wikimedia Commons Public Domain 18th October 2022 Tessa Boase Fashion, Fury & Feminism: Women's Fight for Change When social historian Tessa Boase told the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds she wanted to write their early story, they refused to let her visit their archives. To a former investigative journalist, this was a challenge she could not resist . . . This lecture shines a light on the intriguing story of women’s love affair with plumage ­ – and of the brave eco feminists who fought back on behalf of the birds. Moving from a polite Victorian tea party to an egret hunt in a Florida swamp; from a suffragette ‘monster rally’ to a milliner’s dusty workshop, you’ll be taken back in time to a world where every woman, of every class wore a hat. 8th November 2022 Steven Barrett Sickert & the Camden Town Murder Walter Sickert was the most charismatic British artist of the early Twentieth Century. Ever conscious of his public image, he cultivated a variety of personae: aesthete; provocateur; sage, painter of modern life. He was drawn to shocking or notorious subjects (those more likely to garner attention), especially the sensational ‘Camden Town Murder’ of 1907. This lecture examines the series of paintings and prints Sickert produced in response to the crime and its aftermath. These are compelling images, among the most original by any British artist of the period. How was Sickert able to create great art out of murder? Why was he, and much of the British public, so fascinated by the case? What did the Camden Town Murder series do for Sickert’s reputation and career? 22nd November 2022 Tony Lidington Here We Are Again! - The Great British Pantomime Tony has been a writer and director of historic pantomimes throughout England for over 30 years. He has researched its origins and evolution, from the commedia dell'arte roots, to its first British representation in Georgian England, to the Victorian spectaculars, music hall & variety additions and ultimately into the modern age. Learn about the origins of slapstick and how Britain became the crucible of the pantomime form, independently from the rest of the world. Find-out exactly why pantomime is so popular, what makes it so successful and how it remains such a joyful celebration of all that is quintessentially British. Sketches from the 1891 Pantomime at Drury Lane by Phil May Wikimedia Commons 2023 17th January 2023 Timothy Wilcox The Bayeux Tapestry: 950 Years of Propaganda, Intrigue & Spin The Bayeux Tapestry is instantly recognisable and one of the most outstanding cultural objects to survive from the early Middle Ages. Long admired for its vivid narrative, today it is the unanswered questions that most intrigue modern audiences: was it made in England or France? Was it stitched by men or women? This sparkling lecture looks not only at its creation, but also at its more amazing afterlife. Displayed by Napoleon to bolster French ambitions for a new cross-channel invasion; cherished by Victorian embroiderers as an icon of women’s heroic joint efforts; hunted down by Hitler, who was outwitted by bureaucratic obfuscation. A fluent French speaker, Timothy Wilcox brings a lifetime’s interest in Anglo-French relations to bear on a famous object set to become even more celebrated as it enters its next, surprising chapter. 21st February 2023 Lois Oliver Berthe Morisot: Une Finesse Fragonardienne Impressionist Berthe Morisot is known for her light-filled canvases of modern life: afternoons boating on a lake, young women in ball gowns, children playing. Yet, her contemporaries perceived a connection with the eighteenth century. Renoir considered her ‘the last elegant and ‘feminine’ artist that we have had since Fragonard.’ And the art critic Paul Girard, surveying the 1896 retrospective of her work in Paris, declared, ‘it is the eighteenth century modernised.’ Eighteenth-century art fell from favour following the French Revolution but was ‘rediscovered’ in the mid-nineteenth century by collectors including Louis La Caze and François Walferdin. Morisot copied works by Boucher in the Musée du Louvre and elsewhere; she experimented with red chalk, a technique closely associated with Rococo drawings. She also greatly admired the English painters Gainsborough, Reynolds and Romney, whose work she first encountered on honeymoon in the Isle of Wight and London in 1875. Complementing an exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery, this lecture traces Morisot’s engagement with eighteenth-century culture, and highlights what set her apart from her predecessors and contemporaries. Berthe Morisot Public domain ‘deux soeurs’ 1869 Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 21st March 2023 Mike Higginbottom English Country Houses – Not Quite What They Seem (Harlaxton Manor) Since the Second World War, visiting country houses has become one of Britain’s major tourist activities. Historic homes ranging from the great palaces of Blenheim, Castle Howard and Chatsworth to modest manor houses have opened their doors to the paying public. Visiting the fabulously rich cultural heritage of great houses provides a very broad range of experiences – from major monuments preserved apparently at a particular moment in time to homes which are palpably loved and lived in. Understanding the operation of the distorting lens of time, and the way in which all houses are palimpsests, simply because “...the lives of buildings and the lives of human beings are timed by different clocks…” [Alice T Friedmann], enhances and enriches the visitor’s depth of insight into the buildings, their contents and the landscapes of Britain’s great landed estates. This lecture takes an unusual look at a range of English country houses, examining how their recent history illuminates their more distant past. Picture Mike Higginbottom 18th April 2023 James Russell Seaside Modern: Art & Life on the Beach Between the wars something extraordinary happened to the British seaside: it became glamourous, exciting... modern. Enticed by eye- catching railway posters, holidaymakers grabbed their new cameras and slinky new bathing suits, and headed for the coast. Meanwhile artists galore found inspiration on the beach, from Laura Knight in Lamorna and Eric Ravilious in Newhaven to Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore in North Norfolk. With eye-catching artworks, glorious posters and startling archive photos, this exuberant, colourful lecture explores a remarkable period in 20th century British culture. 16th May 2023 Martin Lloyd Secret Art in the Passport – How We Use It to Fox the Forger From the wax seal to the microchip, man has exploited the skill of the artist and artisan in his attempt to manufacture a forgery- proof document. Taking you through three centuries of passport design, this lecture explains the overt and uncovers the covert to illustrate the defences built in to the passport and the tricks the forger uses to defeat them. You will never see your passport in the same light again! 1945 British Passport 20th June 2023 Twigs Way The Divine Sunflower in Art Worshipped by Aesthetes and cultivated by Impressionists the sunflower casts its golden rays across art and culture. A personification of the divine and the regal, we trace its history from classical myth to twentieth century painting via Van Dyck and Van Gogh, Clytie and Klimt, Monet, Rivera, Wilde and Watts. Green and gold, human and divine, the adoring and the adored, the Sunflower. Claude Monet (artist) French, 1840 - 1926. This image is in the public domain. Nga.gov Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
The Arts Society Grantham
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
LECTURE PROGRAMME   VENUE:  The Theatre of the Guildhall Arts Centre, St Peter’s Hill, Grantham   09.50 – 10.25  Coffee/Tea (complimentary to members) 10.50               Please be seated for Chairman’s welcome and notices 11.00               Lecture begins promptly 12.00 noon     Approximate end of lecture  GUESTS Please notify the Membership Secretary at least 7 days before the Lecture. A Guest will have free entry on their first visit, after which they can attend one additional lecture which will be charged at a fee of £5.   Please ensure your mobile phone is switched off    2022/3  Provisional programme for 2022/23  20th September 2022 Simon Seligman From Venice to Sheffield: Ruskin's Passion for Arts, Craft & Social Justice  Inspired by the bicentenary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819 – 1900) in 2019, this lecture celebrates the extraordinary life and work of this visionary Victorian. As writer, teacher, artist, collector, patron and critic, Ruskin was perhaps the most complete polymath of the 19th century. He left behind a dazzling range of writing and collections that continue to inspire and generate debate around the world. Perhaps most famous today as a champion of Turner and admirer of Venice, Ruskin’s impact ranged far and wide; his ideas inspired the Arts and Crafts Movement and the founding of the National Trust, the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, and the Labour Movement. George Eliot wrote ‘I venerate him as one of the great teachers of the day’, and he influenced the thinking of Tolstoy, Proust and Gandhi among others.  Alongside this international reach, Ruskin became deeply concerned by what he saw as the negative impacts of the industrialization of 19th century England, and as a teacher, thinker and philanthropist he set up projects that aspired to give the working man access to beauty, art, craft and the land. In 1871, he founded what became the Guild of St George, the charity for arts, crafts and the rural economy, and gave it a sizeable collection of art, books and minerals for public display and education in Sheffield. Today, cared for by Museums Sheffield, the collection continues to honour his legacy, sharing something of Ruskin’s encyclopaedic European sensibility for the benefit of a 21st century city. This lecture spans Ruskin’s life and work from the timeless and global to the intimate and exquisite, to paint a portrait of a great life.  Above: John Ruskin in his thirties Wikimedia Commons Public Domain   18th October 2022 Tessa Boase Fashion, Fury & Feminism: Women's Fight for Change  When social historian Tessa Boase told the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds she wanted to write their early story, they refused to let her visit their archives. To a former investigative journalist, this was a challenge she could not resist . . .   This lecture shines a light on the intriguing story of women’s love affair with plumage ­ – and of the brave eco feminists who fought back on behalf of the birds. Moving from a polite Victorian tea party to an egret hunt in a Florida swamp; from a suffragette ‘monster rally’ to a milliner’s dusty workshop, you’ll be taken back in time to a world where every woman, of every class wore a hat.    8th November 2022 Steven Barrett Sickert & the Camden Town Murder  Walter Sickert was the most charismatic British artist of the early Twentieth Century. Ever conscious of his public image, he cultivated a variety of personae: aesthete; provocateur; sage, painter of modern life. He was drawn to shocking or notorious subjects (those more likely to garner attention), especially the sensational ‘Camden Town Murder’ of 1907.   This lecture examines the series of paintings and prints Sickert produced in response to the crime and its aftermath. These are compelling images, among the most original by any British artist of the period. How was Sickert able to create great art out of murder? Why was he, and much of the British public, so fascinated by the case? What did the Camden Town Murder series do for Sickert’s reputation and career?   22nd November 2022 Tony Lidington Here We Are Again! - The Great British Pantomime  Tony has been a writer and director of historic pantomimes throughout England for over 30 years. He has researched its origins and evolution, from the commedia dell'arte roots, to its first British representation in Georgian England, to the Victorian spectaculars, music hall & variety additions and ultimately into the modern age.   Learn about the origins of slapstick and how Britain became the crucible of the pantomime form, independently from the rest of the world. Find-out exactly why pantomime is so popular, what makes it so successful and how it remains such a joyful celebration of all that is quintessentially British.  Sketches from the 1891 Pantomime at Drury Lane by Phil May Wikimedia Commons  2023  17th January 2023 Timothy Wilcox The Bayeux Tapestry: 950 Years of Propaganda, Intrigue & Spin  The Bayeux Tapestry is instantly recognisable and one of the most outstanding cultural objects to survive from the early Middle Ages. Long admired for its vivid narrative, today it is the unanswered questions that most intrigue modern audiences: was it made in England or France? Was it stitched by men or women?   This sparkling lecture looks not only at its creation, but also at its more amazing afterlife. Displayed by Napoleon to bolster French ambitions for a new cross-channel invasion; cherished by Victorian embroiderers as an icon of women’s heroic joint efforts; hunted down by Hitler, who was outwitted by bureaucratic obfuscation.   A fluent French speaker, Timothy Wilcox brings a lifetime’s interest in Anglo-French relations to bear on a famous object set to become even more celebrated as it enters its next, surprising chapter.   21st February 2023 Lois Oliver Berthe Morisot: Une Finesse Fragonardienne  Impressionist Berthe Morisot is known for her light-filled canvases of modern life: afternoons boating on a lake, young women in ball gowns, children playing. Yet, her contemporaries perceived a connection with the eighteenth century. Renoir considered her ‘the last elegant and ‘feminine’ artist that we have had since Fragonard.’ And the art critic Paul Girard, surveying the 1896 retrospective of her work in Paris, declared, ‘it is the eighteenth century modernised.’  Eighteenth-century art fell from favour following the French Revolution but was ‘rediscovered’ in the mid-nineteenth century by collectors including Louis La Caze and François Walferdin. Morisot copied works by Boucher in the Musée du Louvre and elsewhere; she experimented with red chalk, a technique closely associated with Rococo drawings. She also greatly admired the English painters Gainsborough, Reynolds and Romney, whose work she first encountered on honeymoon in the Isle of Wight and London in 1875.  Complementing an exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery, this lecture traces Morisot’s engagement with eighteenth-century culture, and highlights what set her apart from her predecessors and contemporaries.  Berthe Morisot Public domain ‘deux soeurs’ 1869    Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0   21st March 2023 Mike Higginbottom English Country Houses – Not Quite What They Seem (Harlaxton Manor)  Since the Second World War, visiting country houses has become one of Britain’s major tourist activities. Historic homes ranging from the great palaces of Blenheim, Castle Howard and Chatsworth to modest manor houses have opened their doors to the paying public. Visiting the fabulously rich cultural heritage of great houses provides a very broad range of experiences – from major monuments preserved apparently at a particular moment in time to homes which are palpably loved and lived in.   Understanding the operation of the distorting lens of time, and the way in which all houses are palimpsests, simply because “...the lives of buildings and the lives of human beings are timed by different clocks…” [Alice T Friedmann], enhances and enriches the visitor’s depth of insight into the buildings, their contents and the landscapes of Britain’s great landed estates.   This lecture takes an unusual look at a range of English country houses, examining how their recent history illuminates their more distant past.  Picture Mike Higginbottom  18th April 2023 James Russell Seaside Modern: Art & Life on the Beach  Between the wars something extraordinary happened to the British seaside: it became glamourous, exciting... modern. Enticed by eye-catching railway posters, holidaymakers grabbed their new cameras and slinky new bathing suits, and headed for the coast.   Meanwhile artists galore found inspiration on the beach, from Laura Knight in Lamorna and Eric Ravilious in Newhaven to Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore in North Norfolk. With eye-catching artworks, glorious posters and startling archive photos, this exuberant, colourful lecture explores a remarkable period in 20th century British culture.    16th May 2023 Martin Lloyd Secret Art in the Passport – How We Use It to Fox the Forger  From the wax seal to the microchip, man has exploited the skill of the artist and artisan in his attempt to manufacture a forgery-proof document.   Taking you through three centuries of passport design, this lecture explains the overt and uncovers the covert to illustrate the defences built in to the passport and the tricks the forger uses to defeat them. You will never see your passport in the same light again!   1945 British Passport   20th June 2023 Twigs Way The Divine Sunflower in Art  Worshipped by Aesthetes and cultivated by Impressionists the sunflower casts its golden rays across art and culture. A personification of the divine and the regal, we trace its history from classical myth to twentieth century painting via Van Dyck and Van Gogh, Clytie and Klimt, Monet, Rivera, Wilde and Watts. Green and gold, human and divine, the adoring and the adored, the Sunflower.    Claude Monet (artist) French, 1840 - 1926. This image is in the public domain. Nga.gov
Programme of Lectures