PROPOSED LECTURE PROGRAMME 2020/21 Membership year Start of our 2021/2022 Membership year VENUE: The Theatre of the Guildhall Arts Centre, St Peter’s Hill, Grantham 09.50 – 10.25 Coffee/Tea (complimentary to members) 10.50 Please be seated for Chairman’s welcome and notices 11.00 Lecture begins promptly 12.00 noon Approximate end of lecture Details of the lectures to follow: 21st September 2021 Timothy Walker The Subtle Science & Exact Art of Colour in English Garden Design In 1882 Gertrude Jekyll wrote a short but seminal article in The Garden in which she urged the readers to “remember that in a garden we are painting a picture”. As an accomplished watercolour artist, Miss Jekyll was familiar with the principles of using colours, but she felt that in gardens these principles “had been greatly neglected”. This talk looks at how to apply these principles in designing a border, but it also looks at the ways in which a border is different from a painting. However, it goes further than this and looks at how contemporary work of the likes of Turner, Monet, Rothko, Jackson Pollack evolved in parallel with ideas about what a garden or border should look like. 19th October 2021 Brian Stater Women Behind the Lens: Outstanding Female Photographers & their Contribution to the Art of Photography The work of women photographers has often been unfairly neglected. This lecture seeks to correct that by examining the contribution of three outstanding British practitioners; Julia Margaret Cameron, a Victorian pioneer; Jane Bown, a brilliant portraitist; and Fay Godwin, who excelled in landscape photography. We also explore the work of two highly influential Americans: Dorothea Lange, who produced brilliant documentary images and Annie Leibovitz, who continues to both surprise and delight her audience. Paul and Virginia, by Julia Margaret Cameron 2nd November 2021 Chris Alexander Unravelling the Silk Road: A Textile Journey CHRISTMAS LECTURE Wool, cotton and silk have each played a crucial role in the fortunes of Central Asia. Wool created the clothing and housing needed by the great nomadic cultures that were to dominate Middle Asia. Silk was more valuable than gold and used as currency, creating a network of trading routes that led to the first outbreak of globalisation. Cotton was the cause of Russian and then Soviet Colonisation and continues to cause controversy today as well as human misery and environmental catastrophe The felts, carpets, embroideries, robes and veils of the Silk Road stratified wealth, displayed religious and political entrenchments and changed the fortunes of this fascinating part of the world; a meeting place between Mohammed and Marx. 30th November 2021 Sandy Burnett Celebrate, Rejoice, Rise Up – Christmas in Bach’s Leipzig Sandy Burnett’s close relationship with Bach’s music stretches back for decades; between 1997 and 2010 he directed a complete cycle of Bach’s sacred cantatas in West London. In this illustrated talk he explores how Bach brings the Christmas story alive in his Weihnachtsoratorium or Christmas Oratorio, written for Lutheran congregations in 1730s Leipzig. An overview of Bach’s life and achievement precedes a close look at this magnificent work which draws on various forms ranging from recitative, arioso, aria, chorale, and instrumental sinfonia through to full-blown choruses which are infused with the joyous spirit of the dance. Christmas postcard 1905 Germany -Creative Commons 2022 18th January 2022 Caroline Shenton Packing Up the Nation This is the gripping and sometimes hilarious story of how a band of heroic curators and eccentric custodians saved Britain’s national heritage during our Darkest Hour. As Hitler’s forces gathered on the other side of the Channel to threaten these islands, men and women from London’s national museums, galleries and archives forged extraordinary plans to evacuate their collections to safety. Utilising country houses from Buckinghamshire to Cumbria, tube tunnels, Welsh mines and Wiltshire quarries, a dedicated team of unlikely heroes packed up their greatest treasures in a race against time during the sweltering summer of 1939, dispatching them throughout the country on a series of secret wartime adventures, retold in this talk. 15th February 2022 Barbara Askew Windsor Castle from Medieval Fortress to Royal Palace This lecture traces the development of Windsor Castle from an 11th century fortress into a magnificent palace and illustrates how it has been successively enlarged, adapted and rebuilt by monarchs from Henry II to Queen Elizabeth II. Windsor Castle 1907 15th March 2022 Richard Thomas Bronzes of Ifa & Benin No synopsis yet 19th April 2022 Jo Banham Papers from Peking: Chinese Wallpapers No synopsis yet 17th May 2022 Helen Doe Merchant Ship Figureheads Why were they created and what and who did they represent? In the 19th century sailing ships with their colourful figureheads were a regular sight but now just a few figureheads survive. Pelican of London figurehead Creative Commons 21st June 2022 AGM followed by Roger Butler Hidden World of Canal Heritage (including the Grantham & Nottingham Canals) This lecture examines the unique buildings and structures associated with the UK’s canal network, with a vast array of distinctive designs, landmark features and unusual artefacts: only the National Trust and the Church of England have more listed structures than our canals. Look out for lock flights and lighthouses; cottages and clock towers; warehouses and lots of whimsical architecture - our canals delight the eye and refresh the spirit. Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
The Arts Society Grantham
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
PROPOSED LECTURE PROGRAMME 2020/21 Membership year Start of our 2021/2022 Membership year VENUE: The Theatre of the Guildhall Arts Centre, St Peter’s Hill, Grantham 09.50 – 10.25 Coffee/Tea (complimentary to members) 10.50 Please be seated for Chairman’s welcome and notices 11.00 Lecture begins promptly 12.00 noon Approximate end of lecture Details of the lectures to follow: 21st September 2021 Timothy Walker The Subtle Science & Exact Art of Colour in English Garden Design In 1882 Gertrude Jekyll wrote a short but seminal article in The Garden in which she urged the readers to “remember that in a garden we are painting a picture”. As an accomplished watercolour artist, Miss Jekyll was familiar with the principles of using colours, but she felt that in gardens these principles “had been greatly neglected”. This talk looks at how to apply these principles in designing a border, but it also looks at the ways in which a border is different from a painting. However, it goes further than this and looks at how contemporary work of the likes of Turner, Monet, Rothko, Jackson Pollack evolved in parallel with ideas about what a garden or border should look like. 19th October 2021 Brian Stater Women Behind the Lens: Outstanding Female Photographers & their Contribution to the Art of Photography The work of women photographers has often been unfairly neglected. This lecture seeks to correct that by examining the contribution of three outstanding British practitioners; Julia Margaret Cameron, a Victorian pioneer; Jane Bown, a brilliant portraitist; and Fay Godwin, who excelled in landscape photography. We also explore the work of two highly influential Americans: Dorothea Lange, who produced brilliant documentary images and Annie Leibovitz, who continues to both surprise and delight her audience. Paul and Virginia, by Julia Margaret Cameron 2nd November 2021 Chris Alexander Unravelling the Silk Road: A Textile Journey CHRISTMAS LECTURE Wool, cotton and silk have each played a crucial role in the fortunes of Central Asia. Wool created the clothing and housing needed by the great nomadic cultures that were to dominate Middle Asia. Silk was more valuable than gold and used as currency, creating a network of trading routes that led to the first outbreak of globalisation. Cotton was the cause of Russian and then Soviet Colonisation and continues to cause controversy today as well as human misery and environmental catastrophe The felts, carpets, embroideries, robes and veils of the Silk Road stratified wealth, displayed religious and political entrenchments and changed the fortunes of this fascinating part of the world; a meeting place between Mohammed and Marx. 30th November 2021 Sandy Burnett Celebrate, Rejoice, Rise Up – Christmas in Bach’s Leipzig Sandy Burnett’s close relationship with Bach’s music stretches back for decades; between 1997 and 2010 he directed a complete cycle of Bach’s sacred cantatas in West London. In this illustrated talk he explores how Bach brings the Christmas story alive in his Weihnachtsoratorium or Christmas Oratorio, written for Lutheran congregations in 1730s Leipzig. An overview of Bach’s life and achievement precedes a close look at this magnificent work which draws on various forms ranging from recitative, arioso, aria, chorale, and instrumental sinfonia through to full- blown choruses which are infused with the joyous spirit of the dance. Christmas postcard 1905 Germany -Creative Commons 2022 18th January 2022 Caroline Shenton Packing Up the Nation This is the gripping and sometimes hilarious story of how a band of heroic curators and eccentric custodians saved Britain’s national heritage during our Darkest Hour. As Hitler’s forces gathered on the other side of the Channel to threaten these islands, men and women from London’s national museums, galleries and archives forged extraordinary plans to evacuate their collections to safety. Utilising country houses from Buckinghamshire to Cumbria, tube tunnels, Welsh mines and Wiltshire quarries, a dedicated team of unlikely heroes packed up their greatest treasures in a race against time during the sweltering summer of 1939, dispatching them throughout the country on a series of secret wartime adventures, retold in this talk. 15th February 2022 Barbara Askew Windsor Castle from Medieval Fortress to Royal Palace This lecture traces the development of Windsor Castle from an 11th century fortress into a magnificent palace and illustrates how it has been successively enlarged, adapted and rebuilt by monarchs from Henry II to Queen Elizabeth II. Windsor Castle 1907 15th March 2022 Richard Thomas Bronzes of Ifa & Benin No synopsis yet 19th April 2022 Jo Banham Papers from Peking: Chinese Wallpapers No synopsis yet 17th May 2022 Helen Doe Merchant Ship Figureheads Why were they created and what and who did they represent? In the 19th century sailing ships with their colourful figureheads were a regular sight but now just a few figureheads survive. Pelican of London figurehead Creative Commons 21st June 2022 AGM followed by Roger Butler Hidden World of Canal Heritage (including the Grantham & Nottingham Canals) This lecture examines the unique buildings and structures associated with the UK’s canal network, with a vast array of distinctive designs, landmark features and unusual artefacts: only the National Trust and the Church of England have more listed structures than our canals. Look out for lock flights and lighthouses; cottages and clock towers; warehouses and lots of whimsical architecture - our canals delight the eye and refresh the spirit.
Programme for 2020/21